Personal Lines                      

Group Benefits                      

Resources                      

Commercial Lines                      

Individual Plans

Programs                      

Executive Plans                      

Workers Comp                      

Insurance & Employee Benefits

877-GROUP-11 or 516-576-0007


We are seeking insurance related articles pertaining to Healthcare reform, it’s impact on our society and business.  These articles will be referenced to the author and a link may be established if the connected site meets our terms and conditions.

All professionals welcome to submit the articles to the comment box on the home page or call us at 516-576-0007 for our fax and/or e-mail address.  


Other Sources of Interest Related to Healthcare Reform:

For More Information

To learn more about the health care reform law, check out:






 

Insurance Articles

Should I buy long-term care insurance?


If you need long-term care services and have to pay to obtain them, what financial resources could you call on? Do you have enough to pay for four or more years in a nursing home, an assisted living facility, or home health care?

If you’re over 65, don’t rely on Medicare or private health insurance. Medicare doesn’t pay for custodial care, and private health insurance rarely pays any of the cost of long-term care.

If you expect to have very little money when you need long-term care services, you might qualify for Medicaid, a government program that pays the medical and long-term care expenses of poor people.


If you expect to be in that situation, you probably shouldn’t buy long-term care insurance, because your state’s Medicaid program will pay your long-term care expenses. Buying long-term care insurance would only save the state—not you—money. The exception is if you live in California, Connecticut, Indiana, or New York, states that have a Partnership for Long-Term Care program. For residents of these four states, buying long-term care insurance does offer an additional benefit.

If you expect to have a lot of money when you need long-term care services, you also probably shouldn’t buy long-term care insurance. Instead, you should plan to pay for the care “out of pocket”—that is, as a regular expense. One financial advisor suggested in a newspaper interview that if your net worth is in the $1.5 million range, not including the value of your home, you could safely skip buying long-term care insurance and treat long-term care expenses, if they arise, as you do your other bills.

If you fall in-between these two categories, owning long-term care insurance, like all other insurance coverages, offers peace-of-mind benefits as well as financial ones. For example, a recent survey of people age 50 and over asked how confident they were that they could pay for long-term care services if they needed them. Among those with long-term care policies, 52 percent said they were very confident and another 40 percent said they were somewhat confident. Among those who didn’t own a long-term care policy, only 8 percent were very confident and only 27 percent were somewhat confident.

But if you’re under 85—and especially if you’re under 65—that doesn’t mean you should ignore the topic of long-term care insurance because






So, unless you have so little money that you will qualify for Medicaid, or so much money that you can pay the bills out of your own pocket, you should consider buying long-term care insurance.


Source:  The Insurance Information Institute  www.iii.org

Insurance Articles - Long Term Care Insurance